Mammals

Majestic Giraffe

The giraffe (Giraffa camelopardalis) is an African even-toed hoofed mammal, the tallest of all land living animals, and the largest ruminant. Its scientific name, which is similar to its archaic English name of camelopard, refers to its irregular patches of color on a light background, which bear a resemblance to a leopard’s spots, and its face, which is similar to that of a camel. In addition to these features, the giraffe is recognized for its extremely long neck and legs and prominent horns. The giraffe stands 5 to 6 meters tall with an average weight of 1200 kilograms for males and 830 kilograms for females. The giraffe is classified under the family Giraffidae along with its closest extant relative, the okapi. The giraffes diet mainly consists of Acacia Leaves which is their favorite food. This photo was taken at Koffylaagte Game Lodge.

Giraffe Picture

Some Facts About Giraffes:
Its tongue is 18 inches long.
Typically get most of their water from the Acacia leaf, but will drink up to 10 gallons of water per day.
The horns or knobs on the giraffes head are called Ossicones
Their heart is 610mm long and weighs about 12 kilograms
Their heart beats up to 170 times/minute

Giraffe Picture

Some More Facts About Giraffes:
Their tongue is black.
Only found naturally in Africa.
Can gallop around 49 to 57 kilometers per hour.
Males known as bulls.
Females known as cows.
Favorite food – Acacia Leaves
Giraffes usually only sleep about 5 minutes at a time.

Giraffe Picture

Directions to Koffelaagte

View Koffylaagte in a larger map

Old Style African Elephant

On game drive through Lalibela Game Reserve we came upon a small herd of African Elephants – Loxodonta Africana. They seemed not to care too much that we were there watching them, but one of them kept giving us one of those ‘Keep your distance’ looks every now and again. We did just that, and the herd was on its way. The elephant is part of the Big 5. Lalibela Game Reserve is located about 90km outside Port Elizabeth of the road to Grahamstown in the Eastern Cape of South Africa. I posted this photo in sepia, because I was thrilled about the way it came out.

African Elephant

King of the Jungle

The King of the Jungle, the African Lion, or Panthera Leo, is a carnivorous animal which is part of the Cat Family. They stand about 1.2m high and are
150 to 230 Kgs. They tend to live in savannas, grasslands, dense bush and woodlands.
Lions are the only cats that live in groups, which are called prides. Prides are family units that may include up to three males, a dozen or so females, and their young. All of a pride’s lionesses are related, and female cubs typically stay with the group as they age. Young males eventually leave and establish their own prides by taking over a group headed by another male….

King of the Jungle

Only male lions have manes. Males defend the pride’s territory, which may include some 259 square kilometers of land. These intimidating animals mark the area with urine, roar menacingly to warn intruders, and chase off animals that encroach on their territory.

King of the Jungle

King of the Jungle

King of the Jungle

King of the Jungle

Female lions are the primary hunters. They often work together to prey upon antelopes, zebras, wildebeest, and other large animals of the open grasslands. Although most of the animals are faster than the lions, the working together helps catch the prey.

King of the Jungle

King of the Jungle

King of the Jungle

King of the Jungle

King of the Jungle

All these pictures were taken at Lalibela Game Reserve in the Eastern Cape, South Africa.

King of the Jungle

Monkeyland Gibbon

Gibbons are apes in the family Hylobatidae. Gibbons occur in tropical and subtropical rainforests from northeast India to Indonesia and north to southern China, including the islands of Sumatra, Borneo and Java. One unique aspect of gibbon physiology is that the wrist is composed of a ball and socket joint, allowing for biaxial movement. This greatly reduces the amount of energy needed in the upper arm and torso, while also reducing stress on the shoulder joint. Sometimes when a gibbon is swinging their wrist will naturally dislocate until the gibbon finishes its swing. This picture was taken at Monkeyland, near Birds of Eden, outside Plettenberg Bay, South Africa.
For more info see: Monkeyland Website or Birds of Eden Website

Monkeyland Gibbon

Cheetah with Cubs

On a trip through the local Kragga Kamma Game Park, we were lucky to
have visited at a stage when the cubs were old enough to run around. They seemed to have been enjoying their home in the park as they were running around and playing with each other.
Cheetahs are apparently quite easy to domesticate, but not sure if I would own one! Their nature is described as being similar to a dog and therefore is unlike the attitude of a predatory cat, not even like a domestic cat.

Cheetah with Cubs