Reptiles

Small Chameleon

A got a little bit of luck for a change with a friend of mine calling me up to take a macro picture of a green crab spider. It just so happened that this little reptile was hiding in the same gooseberry bush as was the spider. It’s very seldom that I get the opportunity to take a picture of a chameleon as they seem to be so scarce in this part of the world. I will add to this post the name and maybe species of this chameleon once I find out.

small chameleon

Karoo Flat Gecko

The Karoo Flat gecko or Afroedura Karroica has a flat head and large copper coloured eyes. The body is covered in a soft granular skin which is a tannish colour with dark blotches. The belly is cream in color. The female will lay two eggs, but a communal nest may contain hundreds. They live mainly under rocks in mountains and grasslands of the Eastern Cape of South Africa. This picture was shot at Koffylaagte Game Lodge.

Karoo Gecko

Another view of the same gecko

Karoo Gecko

Directions to Koffelaagte

View Koffylaagte in a larger map

Tropical House Gecko

The Tropical House Gecko, Afro-American house gecko or Cosmopolitan house gecko (Hemidactylus mabouia) is a species of house gecko native to sub-Saharan Africa. It is also currently found in North, Central and South America and the Caribbean, where it has been inadvertently introduced by humans.
This species is mainly nocturnal and can attain a maximum length of 12.7 cm (5 in). Its diet is varied, and includes animals such as spiders, scorpions, cockroaches, anoles and other geckos. The Tropical house gecko can be found predominantly in urban locations.

Tropical House Gecko

Common Chameleon

Chameleons, of the family Chamaeleonidae are a distinctive and highly specialized type of lizards. They are recognized by their parrot-like feet, their separately mobile and stereoscopic eyes, their very long tongues, their swaying gait, crests or horns on their distinctively shaped heads, and the ability of some to change color. There are approx. 160 different species of chameleons. Chameleons have very long tongues. The tongue extends out faster than human eyes can follow, at around 26 body lengths per second. The tongue hits the prey in about 30 thousandths of a second.

Common Chameleon

Common Chameleon

Chameleons, of the family Chamaeleonidae are a distinctive and highly specialized type of lizards. They are recognized by their parrot-like feet, their separately mobile and stereoscopic eyes, their very long tongues, their swaying gait, crests or horns on their distinctively shaped heads, and the ability of some to change color. There are approx. 160 different species of chameleons. Chameleons have very long tongues. The tongue extends out faster than human eyes can follow, at around 26 body lengths per second. The tongue hits the prey in about 30 thousandths of a second.

The Common Chameleon

Boomslang

A boomslang (Dispholidus typus) is a relatively small, venomous snake native to sub-Saharan Africa. Its name means “tree snake” in Afrikaans and Dutch. The boomslang has a highly potent venom, which it delivers through large fangs that are located in the rear of the jaw. The venom of the boomslang is primarily a hemotoxin. It disables the blood clotting process and the victim may well die as a result of internal and external bleeding. Other signs and symptoms include: headache, nausea, sleepiness and mental disorders.

Boomslang

Mocambique Spitting Cobra

The Mocambique Spitting Cobra or Naja mossambica is probably the most dangerous snake second to the Mamba. When confronted this snake can rear up two thirds of its body and can spit its venom with quick moving accuracy. The venom is ejected from two small holes near the tip of the teeth and is usually aimed at the eyes. The effect is instantaneous causing intense smarting and inflammation and if not washed out with milk or water will cause permanent blindness.
Thanks to Ric and Sharee for sending me this pic from Botswana.

Mocambique Spitting Cobra

Monitor Lizard

Monitor lizards are usually large reptiles, although some can be as small as 12 centimeters in length. They have long necks, powerful tails and claws, and well-developed limbs. Almost all monitor lizards are carnivorous, but some will eat fruit. Species which live in or near water will readily eat fish. They are oviparous, laying between 7 – 37 eggs at a time.

Monitor Lizard