Spiders and Scorpions

South African Scorpion

Scorpions are predatory arthropod animals of the order Scorpiones within the class Arachnida. They have eight legs and are easily recognized by the pair of grasping claws and the narrow, segmented tail, often carried in a characteristic forward curve over the back, ending with a venomous sting. Scorpions range in size from 9 mm to 21 cm. Scorpions are found all over the world, except Antarctica. Scorpions number about 1752 described species.
Though the scorpion has a fearsome reputation as venomous, only about 25 species have venom capable of killing a human being. This picture was shot at Koffylaagte Game Lodge.

Scorpion

Another Angle of the same scorpion

Scorpion

Directions to Koffelaagte

View Koffylaagte in a larger map

Curious Green Jumping Spider

This curious jumping spider is from the family Salticidae in the spider order Araneae. Both spiders and scorpions belong to the class Arachnida.
There are more than 4000 species of these spiders. The jumping spiders big eyes are so sharp, they can see things clearly from as far away as 20 times the length of the spiders body.
All jumpers have eight eyes, and two of the eyes are huge in Comparison. Jumpers have superb vision which is better than any other kind of spider. With its eight eyes they can see in almost every direction at once. This particular spider I shot in my back yard. Each time I got close the spider, it jumped onto my lens, leaving a trail of web all over the camera.

Green Jumping Spider

Another angle of the same spider looking up to where it was going to jump.

Green Jumping Spider

Golden Lynx Spider

From the family Oxyopidae, the Golden Lynx spiders may be immediately recognised by their spines standing out at right angles to their legs. They live on bushes and plants, low vegetation, on or under the grass, or on flowers and leaves. Their size ranges from about 5mm – 23mm. Lynx Spiders are completely harmless to humans. Their common name is indicative of their cat-like behaviour when stalking and pouncing on prey. Lynx spiders to not spin webs and only use their silk as life-lines when jumping or anchoring themselves.

Lynx Spider

Another picture of the same spider photoed in my back yard.

Lynx Spider

Cute Jumping Spider

This cute jumping spider is from the family Salticidae in the spider order Araneae. Both spiders and scorpions belong to the class Arachnida.
There are over 4000 species of these spiders. The jumping spiders big eyes are so sharp, they can see things clearly from as far away as 20 times the length of the spiders body.
All jumpers have eight eyes, and two of the eyes are huge in Comparison. Jumpers have superb vision which is better than any other kind of spider. With its eight eyes they can see in almost every direction at once.

Cute Jumping Spider

Hairy Field Spider

Hairy Field Spiders – genera: Araneus and Neoscona, are part of the family of spiders known as Araneinae. The hairy field spiders spends most of their time sitting on their webs waiting for an unsuspecting bug to be trapped. They make these webs in trees, between trees, on bushes and plants or even under grass. Field spiders are usually medium to large in size, about 5 – 20mm. The colours of this spider varies from cream to brown to black and from yellow to green, usually with distinct dorsal patterns. These spiders tend to make their webs in the evenings and then dismantle it at daybreak. They eat the orb section, but leave the support structures in place for the following evenings web.
This picture was taken at Assegaaibosch Country Lodge.

Hairy Field Spider

Golden Orb Web Spider

The Golden Orb-web SpiderNephila fenestrata is a large colourful orb web spider with an elongated, cylindrical abdomen. Its markings are contrasting colours of black, white and yellow. They have very long black legs that make the spider look flimsy, but easily recognizable. The female Golden Orb-web Spider’s mass is about a 1000 times more than the male. Juveniles, both male and female, spin complete orbs, but only the female adult spins a web of strong thick golden silk. These spiders live in forests, in trees, on bushes and plants or in low based vegetation. They are completely harmless to humans. This spider’s picture was taken at Assegaaibosch Country Lodge

Golden Orb Spider

Miniature Jumping Spider

This miniature jumping spider is from the family Salticidae in the spider order Araneae. Both spiders and scorpions belong to the class Arachnida.
There are over 4000 species of these spiders. The jumping spiders big eyes are so sharp, they can see things clearly from as far away as 20 times the length of the spiders body.
All jumpers have eight eyes, and two of the eyes are huge in Comparison. Jumpers have superb vision which is better than any other kind of spider. With its eight eyes they can see in almost every direction at once.
This spiders body is just smaller than 4mm in length with this picture being a magnification of approx. 5X.

Miniature Jumping Spider

Wall Crab Spider

Wall Crab Spiders, from the family Selenopidae, are common in houses, especially in the eastern regions of South Africa. These are pretty common house spiders and are also known as Flatties. They have flat bodies and legs that are spread out like a crab. They have long spines on the legs possibly for sensing movement. They are extremely agile and can move very fast when either hunting or if they are disturbed.

Wall Crab Spider

Kite Spider

This Kite Spider – Gasteracantha falcicornis’ photo was taken in the bushes around the Fish River Resort outside Port Alfred. It is one of the more commonly found kite spiders. Their abdomens are shiny, very colourful and hard and have a number of spiny projections. Their sizes range from around 5mm to 15mm with the female being much larger than the male. They spin the common round orb web and wait in the center for their pray.

Kite Spider

Button Spider

Button Spiders or Latrodectus Geometricus are some of the most dangerous spiders of Southern Africa. They have neurotoxic venom which affects the heart as well as the respiratory system. It is a very painful bite and one will usually see symptoms within half an hour. At the site of the bite will be red and swollen and often one will get a rash. Strangely enough no deaths have yet been recorded in South Africa.

Button Spider