Monthly Archive: November 2010

Protea

Sometimes also called sugarbushes, the Protea was named by Carl Linnaeus after the Greek god Proteus, who could change his form at will, because proteas have such different forms. Proteas belong to the Proteaceae family. 92% of the species occur only in the Cape Floristic Region, a narrow belt of mountainous coastal land from Clanwilliam to Grahamstown. I belive this particular Protea is Protea eximia.

Protea

Cape Edelweiss

The Lanaria lanata or Cape Edelweiss or Kapokblom is its name. I found this name in a very old book, but cannot find any real information on it. It is a perennial herb which grows in tussocks on sandy hills. An upright plant growing to 800 mm, with numerous stiff, narrow leaves at the base arising from a woody rootstock. The flowering stalk ends in a densely woolly, white head with hidden, small, mauve flowers. Honey bees are attracted by the light honey-like scent and nectar, and various monkey beetles are common visitors. Flowering is strongly stimulated by fire.

Cape Edelweiss