Monthly Archive: January 2011

Monkeyland Gibbon

Gibbons are apes in the family Hylobatidae. Gibbons occur in tropical and subtropical rainforests from northeast India to Indonesia and north to southern China, including the islands of Sumatra, Borneo and Java. One unique aspect of gibbon physiology is that the wrist is composed of a ball and socket joint, allowing for biaxial movement. This greatly reduces the amount of energy needed in the upper arm and torso, while also reducing stress on the shoulder joint. Sometimes when a gibbon is swinging their wrist will naturally dislocate until the gibbon finishes its swing. This picture was taken at Monkeyland, near Birds of Eden, outside Plettenberg Bay, South Africa.
For more info see: Monkeyland Website or Birds of Eden Website

Monkeyland Gibbon

Boomslang

A boomslang (Dispholidus typus) is a relatively small, venomous snake native to sub-Saharan Africa. Its name means “tree snake” in Afrikaans and Dutch. The boomslang has a highly potent venom, which it delivers through large fangs that are located in the rear of the jaw. The venom of the boomslang is primarily a hemotoxin. It disables the blood clotting process and the victim may well die as a result of internal and external bleeding. Other signs and symptoms include: headache, nausea, sleepiness and mental disorders.

Boomslang

Fulvous Duck

The Fulvous Duck or Dendrocygna Bicolor is found in fresh water lakes and dams. It is one of the most widespread species of waterfowl in the world. The Fulvous Whistling-Duck‘s have a mostly seed-based diet which makes it fond of rice-growing areas. It nests on a stick platform in reeds, laying 8 to 12 eggs, but hollow trees or old bird nests are occasionally used for nesting.

Fulvous Duck

White Torch Cactus

This cactus is otherwise known as Echinopsis spachiana. This cactus has a number of common names (Easter lily cactus, golden torch, white torch cactus), but derives its scientific name from the Greek for the hedgehog and the sea-urchin, because of the species’ spiny exteriors that they are thought to resemble. Once the plant has reached 1 metre in height, it is ready to show off its beautiful, hairy-tubed flowers, which can sprawl to a diameter of 15cm. An outer ring of multiple and apparently independent stamens are united at their base to form a ring known as an annulus or hymen, which serves as a nectar guide for visiting moths. These flowers only have a lifespanĀ of 24hrs.

White Torch Cactus