Monthly Archive: July 2011

Clown Fish

The False Clown’s other common names are Common Clownfish, False Clown Anemonefish, False Anemonefish, and, the much more familiar, Nemo from the movie Finding Nemo in which Marlin was correctly shown as being immune to the sting of a sea anemone. Like other anemone fish, false clowns have a symbiotic relationship with selected sea anemones that provide their habitats. – taken from: This Site
This photo was sent to me by Juan Scholtz and he allowed me to post this for him:
“This was my first attempt at underwater photography, taken with my new Intova IC-12 camera. The picture was taken on the Holiday Inn Phi Phi Island’s (Thailand) house reef at a depth of about 12m. I spotted the family on their anemone, and they provided a lot of entertainment, as the male was very playful.”

Clown Fish Nemo

Billabong Pro 2011 Surfer

I was lucky enough to be given the opportunity to go and take some surfing photos at the Billabong Pro 2011 surfing event.  This is my first of such photos and will be trying different types in the future. The man in the photo is Australia’s Mick Fanning. This event took place from July 14 – 24, 2011 in Jeffreys Bay, Eastern Cape, South Africa. This prestigious surfing event was staged at the Supertubes, the 300 metre stretch of coastline universally acknowledged as one of the planet’s top 10 high performance surf breaks.

Billabong Pro Surfer

Another shot of Mick Fanning

Billabong Pro Surfer

Cape Bulbul

This Cape BulbulPycnonotus capensis is found in the coastal bush and fynbos of the Western and Eastern Cape.
The colouration of the bulbul is a dull, blackish brown – the colour extending further down the underparts than in the related Red-eyed and Common Bulbuls. The undertail coverts are bright yellow. The most notable feature though is the prominent white eye-ring, which usually appears much wider at the front (towards the bill) than the rear. The Bulbul’s diet consists of fruit, nectar,seeds and insects. This one was caught on camera at Thunzi Bush Lodge outside Port Elizabeth in the Eastern Cape of South Africa

Cape bulBul

Female Scarlet Chested Sunbird

The male Scarlet Chested Sunbird (Chalcomitra Senegalensis) is easily identified by its mainly black body and scarlet breast, its green crown and throat. The female is dark greyish-olive in colour. Its breast is more darker and mottled than the Amethyst Sunbird. The Scarlet Chested Sunbird’s diet consists mainly of nectar, insects and spiders. The Afrikaans name for this bird is the Rooiborssuikerbekkie. This specimen was photoed at Thunzi Bush Lodge outside Port Elizabeth in the Eastern Cape of South Africa

Female Scarlet Chested Sunbird

Map to Thunzi Bush Lodge

View Thunzi Bush Lodge in a larger map

Black Headed Oriole

The Black-headed Oriole or Oriolus larvatus is an African bird. Its a beautiful bird with a bright yellow body, black head and pinkish coloured beak. It lives mostly in sub-Saharan Africa from Sudan and Ethiopia in the north to South Africa in the south. It’s habitat is mainly in forests and bushy areas. The Black-headed Oriole is a Southern African bird which is part of the Oriolidae bird family group. The Oriole’s diet consists of fruit, insects, nectar and berries. This picture was take at ‘The Island’ near Seaview Lion Park outside Port Elizabeth Eastern Cape in South Africa.

Black Headed Oriole

Another Black-Headed Oriole, this time photographed by Zane Hobson with a Canon 7D with 100-400mm Lens of Port Elizabeth.

Black Headed Oriole

A Google Map on the location of The Island

View The Island in a larger map

Spotted Thick Knee

The Spotted Thick-knee is commonly known as the Dikkop in South Africa. It’s scientific name is Burhinus Capensis. It is a common resident in any open country area, including parks and fields. They are often found in pairs and are masters of camouflage. They can remain absolutely still such that they will not be noticed, but will fly immediately when a predator or a threat is too close. Their diet consists mainly of termites, locusts, beetles, other bugs and sometimes small reptiles. This picture was taken at a place called The Island near Seaview Lion Park, outside Port Elizabeth in the Eastern Cape.

Spotted Thick Knee

Spotted Thick Knee

Spotted Thick KneeSpotted Thick Knee

A Google Map on the location of The Island

View The Island in a larger map

Old Style African Elephant

On game drive through Lalibela Game Reserve we came upon a small herd of African Elephants – Loxodonta Africana. They seemed not to care too much that we were there watching them, but one of them kept giving us one of those ‘Keep your distance’ looks every now and again. We did just that, and the herd was on its way. The elephant is part of the Big 5. Lalibela Game Reserve is located about 90km outside Port Elizabeth of the road to Grahamstown in the Eastern Cape of South Africa. I posted this photo in sepia, because I was thrilled about the way it came out.

African Elephant

Greater Double Collared Sunbird

The Greater Double Collared SunbirdCinnyris Afer is a sunbird similar to the Southern Lesser Double Collared Sunbird, but is distinguished by its Longer bill and wider red breast band. These sunbirds mainly habitat the fynbos, forests and coastal bush areas. Endemic to southern Africa, occurring from the far south of Namibia to South Africa, with the bulk of its population centered around the Western Cape extending east and north to KwaZulu-Natal, Swaziland, Mpumalanga and Limpopo Province. It generally prefers fynbos and Karoo shrubland, woodland, Afromontane forest, gardens and Eucalyptus plantations. They mainly feeds on nectar, supplemented with athropods, gleaning prey from vegetation and spider webs and hawking insects aerially. The Afrikaans Name for this is the Groot Rooibandsuikerbekkie

Greater Double Collared Sunbird