Monthly Archive: August 2011

Little Egret

The Little Egret is a small, slender egret with a black bill, black legs and yellow toes. The bill is more slender and slightly shorter than that of a Western Reef Heron. The Little Egret is a common resident to wetlands, estuaries and along the coast. They breed colonially, up to 120 pairs, usually with other egrets, herons,cormoants and ibises. The female will lay 2 to 4 eggs in reeds or in a tree. Their diet consists mainly of small fish and frogs. They will actively persue small fish in shallow waters. The Afrikaans name for this bird is Die Kleinwitreier.

Little Egret

Another Little Egret taken a while back in SchoenmakersKop

Little Egret

Tropical House Gecko

The Tropical House Gecko, Afro-American house gecko or Cosmopolitan house gecko (Hemidactylus mabouia) is a species of house gecko native to sub-Saharan Africa. It is also currently found in North, Central and South America and the Caribbean, where it has been inadvertently introduced by humans.
This species is mainly nocturnal and can attain a maximum length of 12.7 cm (5 in). Its diet is varied, and includes animals such as spiders, scorpions, cockroaches, anoles and other geckos. The Tropical house gecko can be found predominantly in urban locations.

Tropical House Gecko

Honey Bee

Honey bees come from the family Apidae and its scientific name is Apis Mellifera. Honey bees range in sizes from around 13mm to 15mm in length. They are truely social insects and have a division of labour amoungst themselves. Their nests (hives) are predominantly made from wax and resins and are built in existing cavities. Worker bees are black with redish brown bands and have black legs and clear wings. The queen bee looks like the worker bees but is larger and drones are much darker and their abdomans lack the banding and are sqaured off. This bee picture was shot in my back yard.

Honey Bee

Common Dotted Border Butterfly

The Common Dotted Border Butterfly or Mylothris Agathina Agathina can be found in most of South Africa. It is a butterfly of the Pieridae family It is common along the coastal forests and in wooded country areas. Its habitats are forest edges, parks, gardens, flatlands, coasts and hillsides. The wingspan is 50 to 60 millimetres for males and 52 to 65 mm for females. The adults are on wing year round, with peaks in October and from late February to April. This particular specimen was photoed at Assegaaibosch Country Lodge in the Eastern Cape of South Africa.

Common Dotted Border Butterfly

Golden Lynx Spider

From the family Oxyopidae, the Golden Lynx spiders may be immediately recognised by their spines standing out at right angles to their legs. They live on bushes and plants, low vegetation, on or under the grass, or on flowers and leaves. Their size ranges from about 5mm – 23mm. Lynx Spiders are completely harmless to humans. Their common name is indicative of their cat-like behaviour when stalking and pouncing on prey. Lynx spiders to not spin webs and only use their silk as life-lines when jumping or anchoring themselves.

Lynx Spider

Another picture of the same spider photoed in my back yard.

Lynx Spider

Hadeda Ibis

A really dull, drab, grey-brown bird, but at close range reveals glossy bronzy green colours. The Hadeda Ibis has a long, dark decurved bill which has a red ridge on the upper mandible. You will find these Hadedas in forest clearings, woodlands, open grasslands, farmlands and your garden. Bostrychia Hagedash is particularly common to South Africa and other southern African countries. Their call, mainly while in-flight, is a noisy ‘ha-ha-ha-dah-da’ from which it probably gets it’s name.

Hadeda Ibis

Another picture of the same Hadeda Ibis.

Hadeda Ibis