Tag Archive: Canon Photography

South African Scorpion

Scorpions are predatory arthropod animals of the order Scorpiones within the class Arachnida. They have eight legs and are easily recognized by the pair of grasping claws and the narrow, segmented tail, often carried in a characteristic forward curve over the back, ending with a venomous sting. Scorpions range in size from 9 mm to 21 cm. Scorpions are found all over the world, except Antarctica. Scorpions number about 1752 described species.
Though the scorpion has a fearsome reputation as venomous, only about 25 species have venom capable of killing a human being. This picture was shot at Koffylaagte Game Lodge.

Scorpion

Another Angle of the same scorpion

Scorpion

Directions to Koffelaagte

View Koffylaagte in a larger map

Cape Weaver Building a Nest

The Cape Weaver, Ploceus capensis is a resident breeding bird species endemic to South Africa. This common species occurs in grassland, agricultural and fynbos habitats, often near rivers. It breeds in trees and reedbeds. This one was in a fever tree. The Cape Weaver builds a large coarsely woven nest made of grass and leaf strips with a downward facing entrance which is suspended from a branch or reed. The Hadada Ibis will sometimes nest in the weaver colonies. The Cape Weaver feeds on a wide variety of seeds, grain and insects. The Cape Weaver is a stocky 17 cm long bird with streaked olive-brown upperparts and a long pointed conical bill. The breeding male has a yellow head and underparts, an orange face, and a white iris. The adult female has an olive-yellow head and breast, shading to pale yellow on the lower belly. Her eyes are brown. Young birds are similar to the female. This photo was shot at Koffylaagte Game Lodge in the Eastern Cape of South Africa.

Cape Weaver

This one was photoed at Addo Elephant Park

Cape Weaver

Another Cape Weaver photoed at Addo Elephant Park

Cape Weaver

 

Malachite Sunbird

The Malachite Sunbird, Nectarinia famosa is a small nectivorous bird found in the southern part of the Southern African region. The sunbirds are a group of small birds, and are placed within the family Nectariniidae, which is found across Africa, the Middle East and into South-east Asia. The breeding male Malachite Sunbird, which has very long central tail feathers, is 25cm long, and the shorter-tailed female 15 cm. The adult male is metallic green when breeding, with blackish green wings with small yellow pectoral patches. In non-breeding plumage, the males upperparts are brown apart from the green wings and tail, the latter retaining the elongated feathers. The underparts in are yellow, flecked with green. The female has brown upperparts and dull yellow underparts with some indistinct streaking on the breast. Her tail is square-ended. The juvenile resembles the female. This large sunbird is found in hilly fynbos (including protea stands as well as areas with aloes) and cool montane and coastal scrub. It also occurs in parks and gardens. It is resident, but may move downhill in winter. This species, like most sunbirds, feed mainly on nectar, although they will also take insects. This Malachite Sunbirds photo was taken at Schoenmakers Kop outside Port Elizabeth in the Eastern Cape of South Africa.

Malachite Sunbird

Curious Green Jumping Spider

This curious jumping spider is from the family Salticidae in the spider order Araneae. Both spiders and scorpions belong to the class Arachnida.
There are more than 4000 species of these spiders. The jumping spiders big eyes are so sharp, they can see things clearly from as far away as 20 times the length of the spiders body.
All jumpers have eight eyes, and two of the eyes are huge in Comparison. Jumpers have superb vision which is better than any other kind of spider. With its eight eyes they can see in almost every direction at once. This particular spider I shot in my back yard. Each time I got close the spider, it jumped onto my lens, leaving a trail of web all over the camera.

Green Jumping Spider

Another angle of the same spider looking up to where it was going to jump.

Green Jumping Spider

Little Egret

The Little Egret is a small, slender egret with a black bill, black legs and yellow toes. The bill is more slender and slightly shorter than that of a Western Reef Heron. The Little Egret is a common resident to wetlands, estuaries and along the coast. They breed colonially, up to 120 pairs, usually with other egrets, herons,cormoants and ibises. The female will lay 2 to 4 eggs in reeds or in a tree. Their diet consists mainly of small fish and frogs. They will actively persue small fish in shallow waters. The Afrikaans name for this bird is Die Kleinwitreier.

Little Egret

Another Little Egret taken a while back in SchoenmakersKop

Little Egret

BontKiewiet

Because we are in South Africa, we will call this bird a BontKiewiet, but actually it has two other names; the Blacksmith Plover and the Blacksmith Lapwing.
Its Technincal name is Vanellus armatus Hoplopterus. We snapped this birds picture at the Kragga Kamma Game Park just outside Port Elizabeth. The bird was pretty tame as if it was used to the many cars in the park to have driven past it to take its picture.

BontKiewiet