Tag Archive: flying insects

Red Veined Dropwing DragonFly

These dragonflies are from the family Libellulidae. This particular specimen is Trithemis Arteriosa. They are widespread and common with a wingspan of around 58mm. This one is a dull orange colour probably indicating that it is a female. The males are typically red bodied with red leading wings. Their food mainly consists of passing insects.

Red Veined Dropwing DragonFly

Red Veined Dropwing Dragonfly

These dragonflies are from the family Libellulidae. This particular specimen is Trithemis Arteriosa. They are widespread and common with a wingspan of around 58mm. This one is a dull orange colour probably indicating that it is a female. The males are typically red bodied with red leading wings. Their food mainly consists of passing insects.

Red Veined Dropwing Dragonfly

Bee Fly 2

These are flies from the Bombyliidae family of insects. They are a large family of flies and their life cycles are not well known to many studying these insects. They generally feed on nectar and pollen and thus pollinate flowers as they go along. They have an unusually long proboscis used to suck out nectar from the flowers. These bee-flies don’t have stingers, but they look like bees and this helps protect them from predators.

Bee Fly

 

Bee Fly 1

These are flies from the Bombyliidae family of insects. They are a large family of flies and their life cycles are not well known to many studying these insects. They generally feed on nectar and pollen and thus pollinate flowers as they go along. They have an unusually long proboscis used to suck out nectar from the flowers. These bee-flies don’t have stingers, but they look like bees and this helps protect them from predators.

Bee Fly

Water Scorpion

Water Sorpions are aquatic insects that are found all over the world. They belong to the order Hemiptera (true bugs) and sub-order Heteroptera. They are about one to two inch in length. Water scorpions have two pairs of wings and three pairs of legs. Water scorpions are carnivores and feed on small fish, tadpoles and other aquatic insects. The water scorpion’s sting (a bite from its beak-like mouth parts) is very painful, so they should be handled carefully. However, its sting is not as poisonous as that of a land scorpion. This one was found in a swimming pool, but promptly taken out!

Water Scorpion

 

Another Water Scorpion picture taken in a swimming pool.

Water Scorpion