Tag Archive: insects

Sunflower Seed Bug

This Sunflower Seed Bug, Agonoscelis versicoloratus, was shot with a Tamron 70-300mm Macro lens with a Raynox DCR-250 converter lens for the amplification of the subject. They are pretty small insects, about 10 to 12mm in length. They feed mainly on seeds from sunflowers and can be minor pests. They are also part of the family Pentatomidae which consists of shield bugs and stink bugs. They are well armed with stink glands for protection from predators.

Sunflower Seed Bug

Golden Lynx Spider

From the family Oxyopidae, the Golden Lynx spiders may be immediately recognised by their spines standing out at right angles to their legs. They live on bushes and plants, low vegetation, on or under the grass, or on flowers and leaves. Their size ranges from about 5mm – 23mm. Lynx Spiders are completely harmless to humans. Their common name is indicative of their cat-like behaviour when stalking and pouncing on prey. Lynx spiders to not spin webs and only use their silk as life-lines when jumping or anchoring themselves.

Lynx Spider

Another picture of the same spider photoed in my back yard.

Lynx Spider

Honey Bee Mimic

The Honey Bee Mimic comes from the Family Syrphidae and the Order Diptera. It forms part of the Hover Fly Group with its scientific name being Eristalinus Taeniops. It is identified by being a medium sized bee mimic with black bars on its eyes, a dull orange thorax and a yellow and black striped abdomen. If it is caught, it buzzes aggressively but is completely harmless as it has no sting. They are widespread in Africa and Asia.

Honey Bee Mimic

Thread waisted Wasp

The Thread-waisted Wasp ( Ammophila ferrugineipes ) is about 19-28mm in length with a very long waist which is at least twice as long as the rest of it abdomen. According to Wikipedia, its body design resembles a Sikorsky Skycrane helicopter. This species of wasp prefers hairless caterpillars to feed its larva. It stings its prey to paralyze it, so the food stays fresh but unable crawl away.

Thread Waisted Wasp

Flys Eyes

This is a macro shot of a fly’s compound eyes. This is Sarcophaga haemorrhoidalis the flesh eating fly. This fly often breeds in faeces and is often a transportation medium for diseases. Sarcophagidae is the dipteran family commonly known as flesh flies, comprising of approximately 2000 species. Many species of Sarcophagidae prefer to breed in carrion over other mediums, but there are several species that breed in dung. A large number of species are parasitoids or cleptoparasitoids and never breed in carrion. Sarcophagids are rather large in size ranging from 4 to 16 mm. Distinguishing characteristics include a checkerboard like pattern on the abdomen, stripes on the thorax and red eyes. Flesh flies are attracted to anything rotting, including faeces. Sarcophagidae are unimpeded by rain and fly in any weather. Because of this trait, Sarcophagidae will often be the first flies to colonize a corpse after an extended period of rain. Flesh flies appear to prefer sunlight over shaded conditions.

Flys Eyes