Tag Archive: macro photography

Bee on a Purple Flower

I have been trying out my 90mm Tamron Lens recently with my Canon 7D.  I had installed an alpha version of Magic Lantern onto it to see what could be achieved with it.  I was particularly interested in the trap focus function and this picture was the result.

Bee on purple flower

Depicta Copper – Aloeides depicta

The Depicta CopperAloeides depicta is pretty small butterfly ranging from 26mm to 29mm in the males and 29mm to 35mm in the females. Depicta is a relatively variable butterfly, colour-wise. The upperside being a ground colour orange with a wide grey-black border.  The hind wing underside is sandy to buff-brown, occasionally reddish.
The distribution of  this Aloeides is fynbos, Nama Karoo along mountain chains from Matjiesfontein to Gydo Mountain and also Eastern Cape, Port Elizabeth. It’s habitats include hillsides and rocky ledges. It’s flight period is in the warmer months of the year being September to June. The Depicta Copper’s larval food is  Aspalathus. Aspalathus is the genus to which the rooibos tea plant belongs, is the largest member of the pea family endemic to South Africa.
These pictures were taken in Port Elizabeth, Eastern Cape, South Africa.

Depicta copper - Aloeides depicta

Another Shot of a different Depicta copper:

Depicta copper - Aloeides depicta

Most of this information was supplied from Steve Woodhalls book “Field Guide to Butterflies of South Africa

Bark Spider – Caerostris sexcuspidata

Bark Spider

I am not going to say too much about this spider as I have given a pretty good explanation of it on a post a few weeks ago. You can find the information here.

I was trying out a flash guide that I made from one I saw somewhere on the internet. These are the resultant pics of this spider with this flash guide.

Here is a macro of its ‘face’. A stunning looking spider, close up.

Bark Spider - Caerostris sexcuspidata

….. and another of the same spider in its web later on in the evening.

Bark Spider - Caerostris sexcuspidata

Another one taken at van Stadens Flower Reserve

Bark spider

And one off my wall at home

Bark Spider

This was yet another willing spider to sit still for me to take a shot. Thank you Nature…

Bark Spider

These pictures were taken in my back yard with a Canon 7D with a Tamron 90mm macro lense and a 580EX II Speedlite flash attached to this guide:

 

Jumping Spider Macro

This jumping spider macro is a really close up shot of a spider from the Salticidae family. This family resides in the spider order Araneae. and belong to the class Arachnida.
The shot was taken with a Tamron 90mm Macro lens with a Raynox DCR250 attached to it. The problem with this combination is that the depth-of-field is so small that you have to really make sure to take the shot in focus. This shot was taken at f16 to get as much depth-of-field as possible with this lens combination.

Jumping spider macro

Eyed Pansy – Junonia orithya madagascariensis

This photograph was taken in Port Elizabeth at the back of the suburb known as Linton Grange.  She was really obliging and sat really still for the forty odd shots that I took of her. This image was one of the photos that I really liked, but it was a little busy, so toned down the background a little to bring the butterfly out a bit.
The Eyed Pansy has its territories on hill tops, ridges and will sit on the ground or on low vegetation. It will chase away intruders to its territory  even if the intruders are bigger butterflies than itself. The Eyed Pansy is common, but  not as common as the Yellow Pansy. Can be found from Eastern Cape to KwaZulu Natal, Swaziland, Mpumalanga, Limpopo, Gauteng, Freestate, Northern Cape and North West Provinces. Their habitats include hill tops, parks, gardens and forest edges. It’s larval food is Scrophulariaceae snapdragons, and the common South African foodplant is Graderia subintegra – Wild Penstemon.
Most of this information was supplied from Steve Woodhalls book
Field Guide to Butterflies of South Africa
Blue Pansy

Long Legged Fly

The long-legged fly is from the dolichopodidae family. They make up a large family of true flies with more than 7,000 described species in about 230 genera distributed worldwide. They are small and bristly with long strong legs. They are often metallic green with bronze or blue reflections. These flies feed on other small insects. They live in vegetation under trees and shrubs or at the edge of water. The males often have enlarged genitalia which can be useful for species recognition. The adults are predatory on other small animals.
Many thanks to Zane for this stunning macro.

Long Legged Fly

Flys Eyes

This is a macro shot of a fly’s compound eyes. This is Sarcophaga haemorrhoidalis the flesh eating fly. This fly often breeds in faeces and is often a transportation medium for diseases. Sarcophagidae is the dipteran family commonly known as flesh flies, comprising of approximately 2000 species. Many species of Sarcophagidae prefer to breed in carrion over other mediums, but there are several species that breed in dung. A large number of species are parasitoids or cleptoparasitoids and never breed in carrion. Sarcophagids are rather large in size ranging from 4 to 16 mm. Distinguishing characteristics include a checkerboard like pattern on the abdomen, stripes on the thorax and red eyes. Flesh flies are attracted to anything rotting, including faeces. Sarcophagidae are unimpeded by rain and fly in any weather. Because of this trait, Sarcophagidae will often be the first flies to colonize a corpse after an extended period of rain. Flesh flies appear to prefer sunlight over shaded conditions.

Flys Eyes