Tag Archive: South Africa

Brown Hooded Kingfisher

The Brown Hooded Kingfisher (Halcyon Albiventris) is a species of bird in the Halcyonidae family and is distinguished from other red billed kingfishers by its brownish colored head, with black streaks. Its habitat is non-aquatic, thornveld, coastal forests and is also common to gardens and parks. The adults size is about 19 to 20 cm. It is found in Angola, Botswana, Republic of the Congo, Democratic Republic of the Congo, Gabon, Kenya, Malawi, Mozambique, Namibia, Somalia, South Africa, Swaziland, Tanzania, Zambia, and Zimbabwe. This picture was taken in a nearby bush in Port Elizabeth, South Africa. The Afrikaans name for this is Bruinkopvisvanger.

Brown Hooded Kingfisher

The Treasure Flower Gazania

The Gazania, or Treasure Flower belongs to the family Asteraceae. It is a plant native to Southern Africa although one can find this plant species naturalised in Australia, New Zealand, and California. They are widely cultivated as ornamental garden plants. This plant is attractive to bees, butterflies and birds and is also drought-tolerant. It needs; Water regularly; do not overwater. This picture was taken at van Stadens Flower Reserve, just outside Port Elizabeth in the Eastern Cape of South Africa.

Gazzania

Billabong Pro 2011 Surfer

I was lucky enough to be given the opportunity to go and take some surfing photos at the Billabong Pro 2011 surfing event.  This is my first of such photos and will be trying different types in the future. The man in the photo is Australia’s Mick Fanning. This event took place from July 14 – 24, 2011 in Jeffreys Bay, Eastern Cape, South Africa. This prestigious surfing event was staged at the Supertubes, the 300 metre stretch of coastline universally acknowledged as one of the planet’s top 10 high performance surf breaks.

Billabong Pro Surfer

Another shot of Mick Fanning

Billabong Pro Surfer

Female Scarlet Chested Sunbird

The male Scarlet Chested Sunbird (Chalcomitra Senegalensis) is easily identified by its mainly black body and scarlet breast, its green crown and throat. The female is dark greyish-olive in colour. Its breast is more darker and mottled than the Amethyst Sunbird. The Scarlet Chested Sunbird’s diet consists mainly of nectar, insects and spiders. The Afrikaans name for this bird is the Rooiborssuikerbekkie. This specimen was photoed at Thunzi Bush Lodge outside Port Elizabeth in the Eastern Cape of South Africa

Female Scarlet Chested Sunbird

Map to Thunzi Bush Lodge

View Thunzi Bush Lodge in a larger map

Old Style African Elephant

On game drive through Lalibela Game Reserve we came upon a small herd of African Elephants – Loxodonta Africana. They seemed not to care too much that we were there watching them, but one of them kept giving us one of those ‘Keep your distance’ looks every now and again. We did just that, and the herd was on its way. The elephant is part of the Big 5. Lalibela Game Reserve is located about 90km outside Port Elizabeth of the road to Grahamstown in the Eastern Cape of South Africa. I posted this photo in sepia, because I was thrilled about the way it came out.

African Elephant

Regal Blowfly

The Regal Blowfly is a medium-sized fly (wingspan approx. 16mm) from the Calliphoridae family of flies. Its scientific name is Chrysomya Marginalis. It has an orange head, red eyes and a metallic green body. They are similar to the banded blowflies in that they lay masses of eggs on freshly dead animals. In a day or two, the corpse will be covered in larvae (maggots) which will then migrate to the soil to pupate. The regal blowfly is very common and widespread in Africa. This photo was taken at Assegaaibosch Country Lodge (Kareedouw, South Africa)

Regal Blowfly

Wall Crab Spider

Wall Crab Spiders, from the family Selenopidae, are common in houses, especially in the eastern regions of South Africa. These are pretty common house spiders and are also known as Flatties. They have flat bodies and legs that are spread out like a crab. They have long spines on the legs possibly for sensing movement. They are extremely agile and can move very fast when either hunting or if they are disturbed.

Wall Crab Spider

Protea

Sometimes also called sugarbushes, the Protea was named by Carl Linnaeus after the Greek god Proteus, who could change his form at will, because proteas have such different forms. Proteas belong to the Proteaceae family. 92% of the species occur only in the Cape Floristic Region, a narrow belt of mountainous coastal land from Clanwilliam to Grahamstown. I belive this particular Protea is Protea eximia.

Protea