Tag Archive: South African Flowers

Red Beauty

While on a quest to search for spiders and other sorts of bugs for my website, we came across this beauty. It was hiding amongst the grass, but was not to difficult to see because of the contrast of the red flowers versus the green grass. Would really appreciate an identification as we have no idea what plant it is.

Red Beauty

Red Beauty

Red Hot Poker

The Red Hot Poker is native to Madagascar and Africa. It is also called Kniphofia, the Torch lily, and the Poker plant. It is a genus of plants in the family Xanthorrhoeaceae – subfamily Asphodeloideae. The plant grows to a height of 1-1.5m. The plants produce spikes of hanging, red-to-orange flowers which have flowering spikes of pale yellow, ivory, apricot, orange and red. All have long, sword-like basal leaves. It flowers from the bottom upward, and the bright orange flowers fade to yellowish green as they senesce, resulting in a two toned spike with orange flowers at the top and yellowish ones below.
Thanks to Firefly from The Port Elizabeth Daily Photo for permission to use this stunning picture.

Red Hot Poker

Orange Vygie

The Orange Vygie or Lampranthus Aureus is a flower native to Southern Africa. The shiny orange flowers are borne singly or in clusters on short stalks, are 60 mm in diameter and appear from August. Yellow and purple forms also occur. Plants are all pollinated by insects at midday when flowers are fully open. In the past these plants were known as midday plants. They are also referred to as ‘municipal workers’ as the flowers open at 9 am and close at 5 pm.

Orange Vygie

White Torch Cactus

This cactus is otherwise known as Echinopsis spachiana. This cactus has a number of common names (Easter lily cactus, golden torch, white torch cactus), but derives its scientific name from the Greek for the hedgehog and the sea-urchin, because of the species’ spiny exteriors that they are thought to resemble. Once the plant has reached 1 metre in height, it is ready to show off its beautiful, hairy-tubed flowers, which can sprawl to a diameter of 15cm. An outer ring of multiple and apparently independent stamens are united at their base to form a ring known as an annulus or hymen, which serves as a nectar guide for visiting moths. These flowers only have a lifespanĀ of 24hrs.

White Torch Cactus

Protea

Sometimes also called sugarbushes, the Protea was named by Carl Linnaeus after the Greek god Proteus, who could change his form at will, because proteas have such different forms. Proteas belong to the Proteaceae family. 92% of the species occur only in the Cape Floristic Region, a narrow belt of mountainous coastal land from Clanwilliam to Grahamstown. I belive this particular Protea is Protea eximia.

Protea

Yellow Wood Sorrel

The Yellow Wood Sorrel’s technical name is Oxalis Corniculata. This native perennial plant is usually about 6″ tall, but sometimes reaches 1′ or a little more. There is a central stem that branches occasionally, creating a bushy effect on mature plants. It is often covered with scattered white hairs. The alternate trifoliate leaves have fairly long petioles, and are about Ā¾” across when fully open. Depending on environmental conditions, they are light green, green, or reddish green, and fold up at night. Occasionally, they fold up in response to intense sunlight during midday. A nice closeup taken by Kira.

Yellow Wood Sorrel