Tag Archive: South African Spiders

Mygalomorph Spider

Mygalomorph spiders are from a group including more than 2,600 described species, classified into over 300 genera and 15 families. Mygalomorphs include tarantulas (also called baboon spiders) and trapdoor spiders, but many other distinctive taxonomic groups exist. Most Mygalomorphs are relatively large, long-lived (15 to 30 years), ground dwelling spiders – the largest spiders in the world are in fact mygalomorphs. They have very long spinnerets and make messy silky webs. This particular spider is a diplurid, a sheet web spider and the genus is Allothele. She was found hiding under a rock at Koffylaagte Game Lodge.

Mygalomorph Spider

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Hairy Field Spider

Hairy Field Spiders – genera: Araneus and Neoscona, are part of the family of spiders known as Araneinae. The hairy field spiders spends most of their time sitting on their webs waiting for an unsuspecting bug to be trapped. They make these webs in trees, between trees, on bushes and plants or even under grass. Field spiders are usually medium to large in size, about 5 – 20mm. The colours of this spider varies from cream to brown to black and from yellow to green, usually with distinct dorsal patterns. These spiders tend to make their webs in the evenings and then dismantle it at daybreak. They eat the orb section, but leave the support structures in place for the following evenings web.
This picture was taken at Assegaaibosch Country Lodge.

Hairy Field Spider

Miniature Jumping Spider

This miniature jumping spider is from the family Salticidae in the spider order Araneae. Both spiders and scorpions belong to the class Arachnida.
There are over 4000 species of these spiders. The jumping spiders big eyes are so sharp, they can see things clearly from as far away as 20 times the length of the spiders body.
All jumpers have eight eyes, and two of the eyes are huge in Comparison. Jumpers have superb vision which is better than any other kind of spider. With its eight eyes they can see in almost every direction at once.
This spiders body is just smaller than 4mm in length with this picture being a magnification of approx. 5X.

Miniature Jumping Spider

Green Jumping Spider

We bought our daughters some Canon cameras that were on special and they have been snapping everything that moves or doesn’t. They insisted that I put their best pictures on my blog and I could do nothing but agree. Hope you like this first of many from our eldest, Kira.
This particular spider is possibly a Magnolia Green Jumping Spider. Its scientific name would then be Lyssomanes viridis and comes from the family Oxyopidae. The jumping spiders forage for their prey in the daytime. They approach prey slowly and, when a short distance away, make a sudden leap onto the unfortunate animal. They are good jumpers and can leap many times their own body length.

Green Jumping Spider